October 7, 2011


Paris Review 198: The Art of Fiction Nos. 212 & 213

Nicholson Baker: There’s no point in doing it (writing about sex) if it isn’t arousing to some degree… I think it would be really perverse to sit there completely unmoved.

vs.

Dennis Cooper: When I wrote Frisk, for instance, one of my rules was that I could never get an erection when I was writing about sex—it was absolutely not allowed. If I started writing something and it got me hot, I’d stop, edit, and switch gears

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October 25, 2011


Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 40, Vladimir Nabokov

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October 28, 2011


For a long time now I have tried simply to write the best I can. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 21, Ernest Hemingway

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November 1, 2011


Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 175, Richard Powers

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Reading is the last act of secular prayer.

(“Even if you’re reading in an airport, you’re making a womb unto yourself—you’re blocking the end results of information and communication long enough to be in a kind of stationary, meditative aspect.” and, really, lots of awesome and brilliant stuff all throughout this.)

Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 175, Richard Powers

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January 2, 2012


Paris Review – The Book Club, Jason Diamond

On an unseasonably warm day in the Windy City, I asked a fellow customer what he thought about books as an object of design in clothing stores. He lifted a red Jack Spade bag that obscured some of the titles and shrugged, “They make me think the store is smart.”


See Post tags #Paris Review #menswear #Jason Diamond

April 14, 2012


Muldoon has a line in “Sleeve Notes” where he’s talking about Leonard Cohen and he says, “his songs have meant far more to me / than most of the so-called ‘poems’ I’ve read.” Most of us have given up the idea that popular music is not an art form. There’s a way that popular music does what poetry used to do: it brings people together in a common conversation, and there’s a definite sense in which poetry over the past fifty years has become less and less of a popular art form and more a cloistered pursuit. I make the obvious distinction between Wordsworth and Jay-Z, but I don’t make a distinction in the impact they’ve had on my life. Each of them has provided me with what Kenneth Burke calls “equipment for living.”

Paris Review – Michael Robbins on ‘Alien vs. Predator’, Emily Witt

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April 22, 2012


In five years television screens will be half the size of a movie screen, they’ll occupy a whole wall. And people will just sit there. They’re not going to leave the house except to see something groovy, something that they can’t see at home.

The great future, not for creative writers, but for professional writers, is in television, because pay television is going to come in, and that will take the place of the art movies that exist now, and ordinary television will take the place of what now exists in movies. In twenty years, the movies that compete with TV and pay TV will have to be pretty far out. Otherwise people will simply hang with the tube.

Paris Review - The Art of Screenwriting No. 3, Terry Southern (interview conducted in 1967)

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July 27, 2012


look at (Ho13 contributor & new Hobart Web Editor) Jac Jemc, gettin’ some Paris Review love!
theparisreview:


“Writers privately love two things: obsessing over rejection and watching their peers fail.”

Chicago author Jac Jemc on blogging about rejection letters.

look at (Ho13 contributor & new Hobart Web Editor) Jac Jemc, gettin’ some Paris Review love!

theparisreview:

“Writers privately love two things: obsessing over rejection and watching their peers fail.”

Chicago author Jac Jemc on blogging about rejection letters.

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repeat from The Paris Review

August 20, 2012


theparisreview:

“Psychologically, baseball at the AAA level can kill you,” Montoyo told me in July in Durham. “When they say making it to the big leagues is about right place right time, it’s so true it’s not even funny. Just when you think you’re out, you’re in—you get traded, a random guy gets hurt in the big leagues, and suddenly you’re called up, after waiting for two years behind somebody on your former team. Then, just when you think you’re in, you’re out—somebody else gets called up and you are sent down. You get mad, you start wondering, Why me? You start following other players in the box scores, and you focus on things that you should forget about, things you can’t control, and your performance bottoms out. I’ve seen it a thousand times. When you get to a certain level of talent, the difference is not talent but whether you focus things you can control. My job is to keep players focused on today’s preparation and today’s routine, not what happened yesterday or what might happen tomorrow.”
—Sam Stephenson, “Field Notes”

theparisreview:

“Psychologically, baseball at the AAA level can kill you,” Montoyo told me in July in Durham. “When they say making it to the big leagues is about right place right time, it’s so true it’s not even funny. Just when you think you’re out, you’re in—you get traded, a random guy gets hurt in the big leagues, and suddenly you’re called up, after waiting for two years behind somebody on your former team. Then, just when you think you’re in, you’re out—somebody else gets called up and you are sent down. You get mad, you start wondering, Why me? You start following other players in the box scores, and you focus on things that you should forget about, things you can’t control, and your performance bottoms out. I’ve seen it a thousand times. When you get to a certain level of talent, the difference is not talent but whether you focus things you can control. My job is to keep players focused on today’s preparation and today’s routine, not what happened yesterday or what might happen tomorrow.”

Sam Stephenson, “Field Notes”

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repeat from The Paris Review