November 23, 2011


On Writing: The Darjeeling Limited

Jack: You wanna read a short story I wrote in France?

Francis: How long is it?

Jack: Nevermind, forget it.

Jack: What part are you on?

Peter: Nothing, it reminded me of something not related to it.

Peter: Is it supposed to be sad?

Jack: I think so.

Peter: Well, I’m not too crazy about the part where I start screaming at the mechanic. That never happened.

Jack: The characters are all fictional.

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January 26, 2012


You can tinker and get ready and get schedules ready for spring training all you want. It will be nice to get on the field and see people do baseball things instead of looking at sheets of paper.

Robin Ventura On Writing (via mightyflynn)

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repeat from It's a long season.

May 8, 2012


Kobe ON WRITING: 
(note: sure, we all hate Kobe, but you gotta jack those moves/techniques/etc. that work!)
ahhhndrew:

gotemcoach:

“THE IRON LEG”
Dirk Nowitzki showed the world his step back jumper.  Kobe Bryant watched Dirk win the 2010-2011 NBA Championship.  Now, Kobe shoots Dirk’s step back jumper.
Some people might slight Bryant for so clearly jacking “The Iron Leg.”  Not me.  I think it’s incredible.  And awesome.
[slideshow of each version]
Dirk created the best post-Olajuwon post move in basketball, Kobe understood it’s value, and put it in his game.  That’s why he’s great — anything to get better.  Last night, Bryant used it in the Playoffs.
You know, “imitation is the highest form of flattery,” but before you go thinking Kobe’s gone all mushy with the compliments…

“I improved his move.  I can shoot mine from the three-point line.  He can’t do that… Dirk does it well, I do it better.  Mine’s a little sexier.”
-Kobe Bryant

#GotEmCoach

Kobe can do it all.

Kobe ON WRITING: 

(note: sure, we all hate Kobe, but you gotta jack those moves/techniques/etc. that work!)

ahhhndrew:

gotemcoach:

“THE IRON LEG”

Dirk Nowitzki showed the world his step back jumper.  Kobe Bryant watched Dirk win the 2010-2011 NBA Championship.  Now, Kobe shoots Dirk’s step back jumper.

Some people might slight Bryant for so clearly jacking “The Iron Leg.”  Not me.  I think it’s incredible.  And awesome.

[slideshow of each version]

Dirk created the best post-Olajuwon post move in basketball, Kobe understood it’s value, and put it in his game.  That’s why he’s great — anything to get better.  Last night, Bryant used it in the Playoffs.

You know, “imitation is the highest form of flattery,” but before you go thinking Kobe’s gone all mushy with the compliments…

“I improved his move.  I can shoot mine from the three-point line.  He can’t do that… Dirk does it well, I do it better.  Mine’s a little sexier.”

-Kobe Bryant

#GotEmCoach

Kobe can do it all.

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repeat from

June 4, 2012


A knuckleball is a funny thing. It’s very enigmatic. Today I was able to change speeds with it a lot. I was able to elevate some. I’m starting to get a little more of a feel on how to do some things with it. That’s exciting. But still, I tried to do a couple of things, and they did the opposite of what I wanted it to do.

R.A. Dickey ON WRITING

R.A. Dickey (via mightyflynn)

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repeat from It's a long season.

June 14, 2012


…any asshole can make something complicated, difficult, and tedious. Anyone can make something impenetrable. What’s interesting is the delight someone feels when it becomes clear that it’s all made sense from the start.

This Bright River, Patrick Somerville

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August 4, 2012


“You’re the shaman, a little bit, you’re leading the congregation,” he told me. “But you are the same as everybody else in the sense that your troubles are the same, your problems are the same, you’ve got your blessings, you’ve got your sins, you’ve got the things you can do well, you’ve got the things you fuck up all the time. And so you’re a conduit. There was a series of elements in your life—some that were blessings, and some that were just chaotic curses—that set fire to you in a certain way.”
ON WRITING, the bawse Boss
(via Bruce Springsteen at Sixty-Two : The New Yorker)

“You’re the shaman, a little bit, you’re leading the congregation,” he told me. “But you are the same as everybody else in the sense that your troubles are the same, your problems are the same, you’ve got your blessings, you’ve got your sins, you’ve got the things you can do well, you’ve got the things you fuck up all the time. And so you’re a conduit. There was a series of elements in your life—some that were blessings, and some that were just chaotic curses—that set fire to you in a certain way.”

ON WRITING, the bawse Boss

(via Bruce Springsteen at Sixty-Two : The New Yorker)

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August 9, 2012


I now step into this area blindly, I do not know what the wound is, I do know that it is old. I do know that it is a hole in my being. I do know it is tender. I do believe that it is unknowable, or at least unable to be articulable.

I do believe you have a wound too. I do believe it is both specific to you and common to everyone.

themostfunthing:

Charlie Kaufman, killer.

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repeat from The Most Fun Thing

August 20, 2012


theparisreview:

“Psychologically, baseball at the AAA level can kill you,” Montoyo told me in July in Durham. “When they say making it to the big leagues is about right place right time, it’s so true it’s not even funny. Just when you think you’re out, you’re in—you get traded, a random guy gets hurt in the big leagues, and suddenly you’re called up, after waiting for two years behind somebody on your former team. Then, just when you think you’re in, you’re out—somebody else gets called up and you are sent down. You get mad, you start wondering, Why me? You start following other players in the box scores, and you focus on things that you should forget about, things you can’t control, and your performance bottoms out. I’ve seen it a thousand times. When you get to a certain level of talent, the difference is not talent but whether you focus things you can control. My job is to keep players focused on today’s preparation and today’s routine, not what happened yesterday or what might happen tomorrow.”
—Sam Stephenson, “Field Notes”

theparisreview:

“Psychologically, baseball at the AAA level can kill you,” Montoyo told me in July in Durham. “When they say making it to the big leagues is about right place right time, it’s so true it’s not even funny. Just when you think you’re out, you’re in—you get traded, a random guy gets hurt in the big leagues, and suddenly you’re called up, after waiting for two years behind somebody on your former team. Then, just when you think you’re in, you’re out—somebody else gets called up and you are sent down. You get mad, you start wondering, Why me? You start following other players in the box scores, and you focus on things that you should forget about, things you can’t control, and your performance bottoms out. I’ve seen it a thousand times. When you get to a certain level of talent, the difference is not talent but whether you focus things you can control. My job is to keep players focused on today’s preparation and today’s routine, not what happened yesterday or what might happen tomorrow.”

Sam Stephenson, “Field Notes”

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repeat from The Paris Review

September 10, 2012


The storm was a convenient metaphor. What happened, technically speaking, was that I ate shit. Then it started raining very hard.

And still it was fun. So my point is that the really vital common denominator between writing and skateboarding isn’t creation, or reinterpretation, or translation of the world. It is failure. What the activities have in common is the blood they draw, or at least should draw if we’re doing them right.

the art of fiction skateboarding

i’m just wildly stupidly gleefully in love with this dude and (most) everything he says. 

(via dialecstatic)

(Somebody loves them some Kyle Beachy!)

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repeat from dialecstatic

September 24, 2012


Like religion, the game of baseball is founded on aspirations rarely met.

Joe Girardi and Trying Times for the Yankees : The New Yorker

Gay Talese on Joe Girardi, on baseball.

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