October 9, 2012


When I was young I played with some great players that I looked up to… Pat Hentgen, Woody Williams, David Wells, Roger Clemens, guys that were ultimate competitors in all kinds of different ways.

And I learned a lot from them; how important this game is, how important your day is. Every fifth day, you get one chance of making a statement or give your team or help your team in any way. You make that important.

I continued to make that important. And with all of these injuries and everything that’s gone on in my career, I don’t know. I wasn’t ready to stop playing. I’m still not ready to stop playing. I enjoy the competition. I love going out and competing against the best in the world. And I know that some day it will end, but hopefully it won’t end too soon.

Chris Carpenter on finding meaning in a chaotic and random universe. (via themostfunthing)

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repeat from The Most Fun Thing

October 13, 2012


The upshot of many books on writing seems to be: Write, write a lot. When you are done writing a lot, write some more. I wonder if this is always the best route to the creation of something enduring. Am I alone? Or do you find yourself longing to escape from a daily tsunami of words? What if people wrote less and paid attention more?

Peter Orner on writing. (Amen.)

(via monkfishjowls)

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repeat from

November 6, 2012



Sure, sometimes it’s better not to just come right out and say it, for instance “the unicorns” represent “the writing” and that “the unicorns” are the perfect symbol of “the writing’s magical, elusive, cunning, and enchanted nature.”  Sometimes it’s better, sure, to write about unicorns and how anyone who tries to taxonomize the unicorns or frolic with them or brush their glittery manes will actually wind up killing them, whether on purpose, by bludgeoning them to death in a fit of jealous ecstasy, or inadvertently, but forgetting to watch them VERY CLOSELY and to provide them with buckets of Kool-Aid and piles of marshmallows.  People can handle unicorn play way better than what you’re actually trying to say, which cannot, by any means, be said because that would be overt, and I think we all know how we feel about overt, like when a teacher writes on the board 1 = 1 in chalk and then she turns around and smiles with her eyes all wide, and you’re just like, yeah, and this is remarkable/amazing because…?

Rachel Yoder :: “Symbols” (ON WRITING)

Sure, sometimes it’s better not to just come right out and say it, for instance “the unicorns” represent “the writing” and that “the unicorns” are the perfect symbol of “the writing’s magical, elusive, cunning, and enchanted nature.”  Sometimes it’s better, sure, to write about unicorns and how anyone who tries to taxonomize the unicorns or frolic with them or brush their glittery manes will actually wind up killing them, whether on purpose, by bludgeoning them to death in a fit of jealous ecstasy, or inadvertently, but forgetting to watch them VERY CLOSELY and to provide them with buckets of Kool-Aid and piles of marshmallows.  People can handle unicorn play way better than what you’re actually trying to say, which cannot, by any means, be said because that would be overt, and I think we all know how we feel about overt, like when a teacher writes on the board 1 = 1 in chalk and then she turns around and smiles with her eyes all wide, and you’re just like, yeah, and this is remarkable/amazing because…?

Rachel Yoder :: “Symbols” (ON WRITING)

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November 14, 2012


Once it leaves your hand, it’s up to the world what it’s gonna do.

R.A. Dickey on the knuckleball (via mightyflynn)

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repeat from It's a long season.

Last album I was like “I don’t know how I’m finna do this shit again,” but it’s been like that since Southernplayalistic… When in doubt you just gotta go to work.

Big Boi (via austinkleon)

(via austinkleon)

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repeat from more of what i like

November 18, 2012


Writing is frustration — it’s daily frustration, not to mention humiliation. It’s just like baseball: you fail two-thirds of the time.

Philip Roth (via mightyflynn)

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repeat from It's a long season.

December 27, 2012


R.A. Dickey ON WRITING:

The enemy…if the enemy of the knuckleball is spin, then, anything that you do that would impart spin, you gotta kinda, um… remove.

and also:

If you throw a good one, you know it right away. It’s a sensation — I’ve pitched conventionally — when I throw a good knuckleball, I know it the I moment it leaves my hands. If I throw a good sinker, I may not know until it gets to the plate, or the batter reacts to it. When I throw a good on, I know it’s… they’re probably not gonna hit it.

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repeat from NPR Fresh Air

December 29, 2012


sometimes i look up and remember that this is hanging in my office. as… inspiration.

sometimes i look up and remember that this is hanging in my office. as… inspiration.

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January 2, 2013


Ron Swanson ON WRITING.
nbctv:

New Year’s Resolution: Never half-ass two things. Whole ass one thing.

Ron Swanson ON WRITING.

nbctv:

New Year’s Resolution: Never half-ass two things. Whole ass one thing.

(via bbook)

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repeat from a story within a story

January 5, 2013


Earlier, I wrote of the things that I’ve suffered while in pursuit of a lifestyle that makes sense to me. Things such as cold, hunger, loneliness, and fear. What I failed to mention are the ways in which I’ve been blessed through that same pursuit. While hunting, I’ve cried at the beauty of mountains covered in snow. I’ve learned to own up to my past mistakes, to admit them freely, and then to behave better the next time around. I’ve learned to see the earth as a thing that breathes and writhes and brings forth life. I see these revelations as a form of grace and art, as beautiful as the things we humans attempt to capture though music dance, and poetry.

Steven Rinella, Meat Eater

I’m not a hunter, but I love the outdoors and just finished Rinella’s new book, and loved it, and loved this passage, near the end, especially.

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