March 9, 2012


NOON Annual 2012: Blunt Reality as Source | HTMLGIANT

The theme of mothers is also threaded through this issue and for their handling of the maternal trope in particular, and the general excellence of the work, I read rapt the trio and duo of short-short stories from Brandon Hobson and Dylan Nice respectively. From Dylan Nice’s “The Mountain Town:” “I liked the reminder that worth could be made visible.” NOON reminds us that worth can be made visible.

Dylan Nice’s Other Kinds, which we’re releasing later this year, is going to be so many all kinds of amaze.

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July 3, 2012



I kept reading and thinking, the fragments I collected connected themselves into larger and more cohesive systems. Eventually I moved to a different city and got another degree. Other essays had more immediate effect on me but none have had one more profound. What happened while I read Orwell’s essay eight years ago was small. I wouldn’t understand it for years, but I was humbled. In the span of a few thousand words over a half-century old, the world got bigger for me in a quiet way.

—Dylan Nice
(via Truth In Nonfiction: A Testimonial - The Rumpus.net)

I kept reading and thinking, the fragments I collected connected themselves into larger and more cohesive systems. Eventually I moved to a different city and got another degree. Other essays had more immediate effect on me but none have had one more profound. What happened while I read Orwell’s essay eight years ago was small. I wouldn’t understand it for years, but I was humbled. In the span of a few thousand words over a half-century old, the world got bigger for me in a quiet way.

—Dylan Nice

(via Truth In Nonfiction: A Testimonial - The Rumpus.net)

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See Post tags #Dylan Nice #George Orwell #Shooting an Elephant

August 6, 2012


“Dylan Nice’s Other Kinds is the most extraordinary short-story-collection debut I have read in years. It is a book to be memorized.”– Gary Lutz

“Dylan Nice’s Other Kinds is the most extraordinary short-story-collection debut I have read in years. It is a book to be memorized.”
– Gary Lutz

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August 17, 2012



This is a collection about the geography of home. How we leave it; how it does not leave us; how it becomes a space we can walk around in but never belong to again. It is imbued with a palpable longing to return to a place where we are no longer needed. It’s about the way we all want to return. We all want to be our parents’ children again, to walk in the front door, stamping our boots from the winter chill, and be embraced, be welcomed back. Above all, this book is about the dedication right there in the beginning of the book—it reads simply, “for home.” 

Other Kinds Review | HTMLGIANT
First read of Dylan’s upcoming book crops up! Preorder now! (Or maybe even ask kindly for one of our last few ARCs?)

This is a collection about the geography of home. How we leave it; how it does not leave us; how it becomes a space we can walk around in but never belong to again. It is imbued with a palpable longing to return to a place where we are no longer needed. It’s about the way we all want to return. We all want to be our parents’ children again, to walk in the front door, stamping our boots from the winter chill, and be embraced, be welcomed back. Above all, this book is about the dedication right there in the beginning of the book—it reads simply, “for home.”

Other Kinds Review | HTMLGIANT

First read of Dylan’s upcoming book crops up! Preorder now! (Or maybe even ask kindly for one of our last few ARCs?)

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See Post tags #Dylan Nice #other kinds #HTMLGIANT

September 23, 2012


Fiction Review: Other Kinds by Dylan Nice.

In the nine short, satisfying stories of this fluid debut collection from Nice, strained moments of intimacy and misunderstandings appear along with the clipped prose, which is at times lyrical and, at others, sobering and stark. Often, as in “Flat Land,” “Ice Floe,” and “Wet Leaves,” boys from mining families, whose fathers “said things that sounded like scripture, like it had all been thought about long and hard and decided upon,” end up liking girls who come from different, warmer worlds. The results are conversations under streetlights and over beers that usually lead to unreturned phone calls and wishes for what wasn’t meant to be. While each brief story flows into the next, it can be difficult to remember which was which or what really happened. Yet, although the long-term resonance of plot is thin, the immediacy of the words and images make for reading that is visceral and alive with the smell of rain and the pulse of silence. (Nov.)

(via Fiction Review: Other Kinds by Dylan Nice. Short Flight/Long Drive (SPD, dist.), $11.95 trade paper (112p) ISBN 978-0-9825301-9-1)

preorder Other Kinds by Dylan Nice

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See Post tags #Dylan Nice #other kinds #SF/LD #Publishers Weekly

September 30, 2012



"I love the clipped tone of Nice’s work, which sometimes comes across as shy and observant and sometimes as caustic and blunt."
— Kevin Sampsell, asked by Nylon Magazine what October book release he’s most excited about.

Other Kinds will ship this week! And if you order through us, we’ll send you an e-book version for free!

"I love the clipped tone of Nice’s work, which sometimes comes across as shy and observant and sometimes as caustic and blunt."

— Kevin Sampsell, asked by Nylon Magazine what October book release he’s most excited about.

Other Kinds will ship this week! And if you order through us, we’ll send you an e-book version for free!


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See Post tags #Dylan Nice #other kinds #Nylon Magazine #Kevin Sampsell #Powells

October 1, 2012


Another great review, with almost too many smart/kind/awesome pieces to excerpt, but here’s one of those nice chunks:

Unreturned phonecalls, impeded intimacies, homesickness for homes we’ve outgrown: for all of us, these fierce longings are familiar. For me, Other Kinds is a book about human finitude. It encompasses not only its narrators’ nostalgia and alienation, but also mine, maybe yours.


hobartpulp:

“I love the clipped tone of Nice’s work, which sometimes comes across as shy and observant and sometimes as caustic and blunt.”
— Kevin Sampsell, asked by Nylon Magazine what October book release he’s most excited about.

Other Kinds will ship this week! And if you order through us, we’ll send you an e-book version for free!

Another great review, with almost too many smart/kind/awesome pieces to excerpt, but here’s one of those nice chunks:

Unreturned phonecalls, impeded intimacies, homesickness for homes we’ve outgrown: for all of us, these fierce longings are familiar. For me, Other Kinds is a book about human finitude. It encompasses not only its narrators’ nostalgia and alienation, but also mine, maybe yours.

hobartpulp:

“I love the clipped tone of Nice’s work, which sometimes comes across as shy and observant and sometimes as caustic and blunt.”

— Kevin Sampsell, asked by Nylon Magazine what October book release he’s most excited about.

Other Kinds will ship this week! And if you order through us, we’ll send you an e-book version for free!

10 notes
See Post tags #dylan nice #other kinds #Nylon Magazine #Kevin Sampsell #Powells #3am magazine

repeat from HOBART

October 15, 2012



Lily looked at you hard when she laughed. She came to the plains from an eastern city to see the size of the weather, the long breaths of wind, the way you could see the rain well before you rode into it. The place I was from was just as empty but not as flat. It took me years to get used to having nothing on the horizon, nothing farther in the distance to mark time. When I first got off the highway, there was a tin-roofed gas sta­tion at the end of the long exit ramp, then a town you couldn’t see until you were inside it. There were dusty brick streets and storefront bars, a lot of places to find someone who looked a lot like Lily. I met her late one summer night when she caught me about to kill a wasp beneath a streetlight.
"Don’t," she said. (via Flat Land - The Collagist - Dzanc Books)

Dylan Nice’s OTHER KINDS is officially out today.
The final story, “Falt Land,” is included in this month’s The Collagist (and excerpted above).
Gary Lutz says, “It is a book to be memorized.” Diane Williams echoed, “His voice is… capable of probing the darkness with a lyricism that illuminates and enlivens the spirit.” And Publishers Weekly: “The immediacy of the words and images make for reading that is visceral and alive with the smell of rain and the pulse of silence.”
It’s short and could easily be read on a lazy Sunday afternoon, but is powerful enough to warrant keeping in your purse or back pocket (which its small size makes possible!) for random referencing and rereading. All orders through our website also receive the e-book for free!

Lily looked at you hard when she laughed. She came to the plains from an eastern city to see the size of the weather, the long breaths of wind, the way you could see the rain well before you rode into it. The place I was from was just as empty but not as flat. It took me years to get used to having nothing on the horizon, nothing farther in the distance to mark time. When I first got off the highway, there was a tin-roofed gas sta­tion at the end of the long exit ramp, then a town you couldn’t see until you were inside it. There were dusty brick streets and storefront bars, a lot of places to find someone who looked a lot like Lily. I met her late one summer night when she caught me about to kill a wasp beneath a streetlight.

"Don’t," she said. (via Flat Land - The Collagist - Dzanc Books)

Dylan Nice’s OTHER KINDS is officially out today.

The final story, “Falt Land,” is included in this month’s The Collagist (and excerpted above).

Gary Lutz says, “It is a book to be memorized.” Diane Williams echoed, “His voice is… capable of probing the darkness with a lyricism that illuminates and enlivens the spirit.” And Publishers Weekly: “The immediacy of the words and images make for reading that is visceral and alive with the smell of rain and the pulse of silence.”

It’s short and could easily be read on a lazy Sunday afternoon, but is powerful enough to warrant keeping in your purse or back pocket (which its small size makes possible!) for random referencing and rereading. All orders through our website also receive the e-book for free!

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See Post tags #Dylan Nice #other kinds #The Collagist #Gary Lutz #diane williams #Publishers Weekly

November 8, 2012


fast-machine:

i’ll be in chicago saturday night at book cellar to promote latest sf/ld author (and wanna be nickelback roadie) dylan nice. reading with jac jemc. come out. tell rape jokes. smoke cigarettes. do whippets. 7pm. 

we’re coming to Chicago this weekend!

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repeat from fast machine

November 15, 2012


beachsloth:

A Short Essay on the War by Dylan Nice
                The war consumes all. It eats all. It greets all. People look for war searching for meaning to their own meaningless lives. Nothing gives them hope or despair. War though gives them change. As the anonymous person, the titular ‘hero’ of the story, thinks about war he seems almost happy about things. Like a war could finally give him something new different from what he has currently experienced. With a war he can find meaning. Like countless young budding losers before him he can find people who will come together under war. Relationships are forged that way. He imagines such a thing happening to him. War is good for bringing people together and for tearing people apart. It is sad that way. 
                School bores him. His answers are inadequate. They appear unwilling to surrender a degree to him. This frustrates him. Generally people pay for school to receive recognition for the ability to get through school. He sits in a limbo. Unsure if he is a man he dreams of a summer war. Assaults on the senses only occur in spring and summer. Fall and winter are too bleak for war. War needs to be glorified hence the hottest part of the year. He wipes his face clean. Despite his desire for war he wears a clean white shirt. Yes it may be clean now but he wants to be dirty. His cleanliness can be purified by the sheer muck and grime of war. No one even needs to be near war to be in war. It takes place mostly from far away. Only a select few experience it firsthand. 
                People are incapable of anything. All the unnamed character wants is to feel something. Unfortunately the geography limits him. He wishes to get hit by a car. This fails since cars hate him. Those driving the cars love him. Put together and it equals his life, saved. Romance is dead. Even his death is dead. His death fails to happen. Poor creature only wants to die. He looks out for the war to end it or to renew it. To keep himself occupied he tries to starve himself to create variation in his boring useless life. 
                Eventually like all good dead on the inside people he moved into a well-insulated apartment. This keeps him warm. With the apartment he stays on the inside looking out at a world he fails to comprehend. ‘Well-insulated’ indicates one of those young urban professional deals where people live in a style similar to city life only devoid of actual culture. Townhouses are actual townhouses in the cities, but in the suburbs they are weak compromises with what spawned the suburbs. The well-insulated places are full of fear and comfort in equal doses. 
                Wars wait for everyone. Most of war is waiting. This unnamed character wants it since he has nothing else to want.

Have you already picked up Other Kinds? You probably should. It’s good.

beachsloth:

A Short Essay on the War by Dylan Nice

                The war consumes all. It eats all. It greets all. People look for war searching for meaning to their own meaningless lives. Nothing gives them hope or despair. War though gives them change. As the anonymous person, the titular ‘hero’ of the story, thinks about war he seems almost happy about things. Like a war could finally give him something new different from what he has currently experienced. With a war he can find meaning. Like countless young budding losers before him he can find people who will come together under war. Relationships are forged that way. He imagines such a thing happening to him. War is good for bringing people together and for tearing people apart. It is sad that way. 

                School bores him. His answers are inadequate. They appear unwilling to surrender a degree to him. This frustrates him. Generally people pay for school to receive recognition for the ability to get through school. He sits in a limbo. Unsure if he is a man he dreams of a summer war. Assaults on the senses only occur in spring and summer. Fall and winter are too bleak for war. War needs to be glorified hence the hottest part of the year. He wipes his face clean. Despite his desire for war he wears a clean white shirt. Yes it may be clean now but he wants to be dirty. His cleanliness can be purified by the sheer muck and grime of war. No one even needs to be near war to be in war. It takes place mostly from far away. Only a select few experience it firsthand. 

                People are incapable of anything. All the unnamed character wants is to feel something. Unfortunately the geography limits him. He wishes to get hit by a car. This fails since cars hate him. Those driving the cars love him. Put together and it equals his life, saved. Romance is dead. Even his death is dead. His death fails to happen. Poor creature only wants to die. He looks out for the war to end it or to renew it. To keep himself occupied he tries to starve himself to create variation in his boring useless life. 

                Eventually like all good dead on the inside people he moved into a well-insulated apartment. This keeps him warm. With the apartment he stays on the inside looking out at a world he fails to comprehend. ‘Well-insulated’ indicates one of those young urban professional deals where people live in a style similar to city life only devoid of actual culture. Townhouses are actual townhouses in the cities, but in the suburbs they are weak compromises with what spawned the suburbs. The well-insulated places are full of fear and comfort in equal doses. 

                Wars wait for everyone. Most of war is waiting. This unnamed character wants it since he has nothing else to want.


Have you already picked up Other Kinds? You probably should. It’s good.

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See Post tags #Dylan Nice #other kinds #muumuu house #NOON #war

repeat from Beach Sloth